Novice Journal

A little this – a little that!

How to Fight Stage Fright

on December 31, 2011

How to Fight Stage Fright (when there’s no sword on stand-by):

The time has come. The crowd has applauded your entry, the curtains have opened, and you stand alone, mic in hand, facing a sea of people. That’s when it hits. Whether it’s the “thousand mile stare,” the “stutter trap,” the “sweat of doom” or plain old “pass out,” stage fright is a common thing. As someone who’s been on stage and done almost all the things mentioned above, I’ve got your back. 😉

Don’t: Get wrapped up in the fact that there are a bunch of people staring at you. This can lead to a freaked shriek escaping your lips…bad move.

  1. Use the good old “illusions” trick. Pretend like the crowd consists of a bunch of teletubies. Or maybe they’re all just one big sunny blob. Whatever is easy to talk to is what you should imagine. Maybe you’re in Middle Earth, talking to a bunch of Hobbits.

Don’t: Wing it. The less you know of what you’re doing, the more likely you are to become a motor mouth swimming in a sea of confusion.

  1. Practice – but don’t overkill. I know it helps some people to repeat what they’re to say or sing a billion times. Practice does make perfect, but too much of it can take some of the life out of the speech/performance, thus making the “orator” seem mechanical. Been there, done that.

Don’t: Whisper, mumble, or replace your inhales with the word “uh.” People will either grow uninterested, impatient, or tell you to speak up. And all of those things might make you feel even more afraid.

  1. Be confident in what you have to say. Have a strong voice; make the people want to hear you. Have faith in yourself, and that you truly CAN get through this.

Don’t: Get stiff and freeze up.

  1. If you’re gonna be a robot, at least be R2-D2. Have fun. Smile. Loosen up. If the speaker is nervous, the crowd will reciprocate the emotion.

Don’t: Fill your head with negative thoughts. Whichever way your thoughts go, your performance will go the same way. In other words, if you do downhill, so will your speech.

  1. Give yourself a pep talk. “Alright (insert name here) you’re gonna go out there, and you’re gonna rock!” As long as you don’t carry that pep talk aloud onto the stage, you should be golden.

That’s all I have for now. What are some ways that you fight stage fright?

Be sure to check out my other How to’s listed below! I would love to hear from you!

How to keep positive while sick

How to kill time in the doc’s lair

How to get more traffic to your blog

How to get inspiration

How to procrastinate….if you’re me

 

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10 responses to “How to Fight Stage Fright

  1. christyb says:

    Good tips for any public speaker. Even if you don’t feel confidant, pretend to be and hopefully that will become genuine confidence as you begin to speak in front of the crowd. Well written!
    christyb

  2. Malena says:

    I only had stage fright once in my life where I forgot my dance moves altogether. I remember standing in front of the audience in silence and then walking away. I knew defeat when I saw it. After that experience, I realized that it all has to do with enjoyment, and not taking the performance too seriously. It helps to relax. I agree with not over-practising, it can cause overkill and lack of enjoyment.

    • mjray926 says:

      Ouch sounds tough. It really is easier to perform when you enjoy yourself. Thanks for reading, and Happy New Year, Malena!

  3. Eric Alagan says:

    HAPPY NEW YEAR
    Wishing you all the best for 2012
    Eric 🙂

  4. I COMPLETELY agree with don’t wing it. I had to present once to an audience over 100 and thought I could wing it. I COULDN’T. It was horrible. I managed to finish, but not sure if my message got across. You live, you learn, you move on.

  5. Barbara says:

    “If you’re gonna be a robot, at least be R2-D2. Have fun.” – Love this. 🙂 And how true!

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